Espresso Stands

Espresso Stands https://wahospitality.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/shutterstock_363775235.jpg

In Jan. 2016, a 26-year-old drive-through coffee stand owner died from burns she received when her stand caught fire. Propane vapor leaking from a 20-pound barbecue style cylinder was ignited by the open flame of a propane space heater’s pilot light. The space heater was used to heat the stand. She had been using the 20-pound cylinder with a coupler adapter to transfer propane to refill one pound cylinders. These cylinders were used to fuel the space heater. She received burns to 90 percent of her body and died four days later.

Recommendations:

To prevent similar occurrences in the future, Washington State Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) investigators concluded that employers and business owners should follow these guidelines:

  • Employers and business owners should recognize and train employees on the potential fire, explosion, and burn hazards associated with propane gas vapor near an open flame, such as the pilot light of a propane-powered space heater.
  • Employers and business owners should not use adapters to transfer propane from larger cylinders to refill one-time use only 1-pound propane cylinders, as this practice creates a risk of fire, explosion, serious injury, or death.
  • Employers and business owners should follow National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) building fire codes and local building codes to ensure safe building egress (exit).
  • Employers and business owners should provide adequate heat in a safe manner to the workplace.

NOTE: Espresso machines are highly pressurized boilers, but are not required for inspection by L&I.

References:

  1. Weather Underground. https://www.wunderground.com/history/airport/KPAE/2016/1/7/DailyHistory.html?req_city=Everett&req_state=WA&req_statename=Washington&reqdb.zip=98204&reqdb.magic=1&reqdb.wmo= 99999
  2. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). NFPA 30: Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code. http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/all-codes-and-standards/list-of-codes-andstandards?mode=code&code=30
  3. Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Part F-1, Storage and Handling of Liquefied Petroleum Gases, WAC 296-24-47505(14). http://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=29624-47505
  4. S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). 49 CFR 1, 178.65, Specification 39 Non-Reusable (Non-Refillable) Cylinders.                                  https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title49-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title49-vol3-sec178-65.pdf
  5. S. Department of Transportation. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety Information. http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/hazmat/outreach-training/compressed-gas-cylinder-safetyinformation
  6. National Institute for Safety and Health (NIOSH). Carbon Monoxide. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/co-comp/default.html
  7. Carbon Monoxide Fact sheet. https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/carbonmonoxide-factsheet.pdf
  8. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning – Protect Yourself. https://www.osha.gov/Publications/3282-10N-05-English-07-18-2007.html
  9. Washington State Department of Labor and Industries. Carbon Monoxide Poisonings at Indoor Work Places. http://www.lni.wa.gov/safety/hazardalerts/CarbonMonoxidePoisoningsAtIndoorWorkPlaces.pdf
  10. Propane Education and Research Council. Safety and Training. http://www.propanecouncil.org/safety-and-training/
  11. Fire Protection and Prevention, Temporary Heating Devices, CFR 1926.154 https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=106 75
  12. Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Temporary Heating Devices, WAC 296-155-280. http://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=296-155-280
  13. Washington State Department of Labor and Industries. Carbon Monoxide: Sources of Carbon Monoxide in the Workplace. http://www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Topics/AtoZ/CarbonMonoxide/default.asp
  14. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) (2014). NFPA 58: Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code. http://catalog.nfpa.org/NFPA-58-Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas-Code-2017-EditionP1187.aspx
  15. Propane Gas Association of New England. Propane Basics. http://www.pgane.org/consumer-safety/large-tanks/
  16. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), U.S. Department of Transportation. Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety Information. http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/hazmat/outreach-training/compressed-gas-cylinder-safetyinformation
  17. NFPA 1: Fire Code. http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/all-codes-and-standards/listof-codes-and-standards?mode=code&code=1
  18. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), U.S. Department of Transportation. Overfilling Prevention Device (OPD), FAQ http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/portal/site/PHMSA/menuitem.6f23687cf7b00b0f22e4c6962d9c8789/?vgnextoid=7fbe1db0cc84d110VgnVCM1000009ed07898RCRD&vgnextchannel=f7280665b91a c010VgnVCM1000008049a8c0RCRD

 

 

 

Rev. 1/27/17

 


This article is an excerpt from the Handbook for Excellent Restaurant Operations (HERO), published by the Washington Hospitality Association.  Want a hard copy of the whole manual?  It’s one of the many benefits of becoming a member!  Find out more about joining the Washington Hospitality Association here.

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Categories: HERO