Secure Scheduling Ordinance: Suing employers and studies

Secure Scheduling Ordinance: Suing employers and studies

On Sept. 19, 2016, the Seattle City Council unanimously passed the Secure Scheduling Ordinance into law. We’re rolling out bite-sized pieces in the coming weeks to get you up to speed. Or, if you have some time and want to dig in, read our in-depth analysis here.

For today: Private right of action and studies

Private Right of Action

Any person or class of persons who suffers financial injury as a result of a violation of this ordinance may file a lawsuit against the employer and, upon prevailing, may be awarded reasonable attorney fees and costs, including, without limitation, the payment of any unpaid compensation plus interest because of the person and liquidated damages in an additional amount of up to twice the unpaid compensation; a penalty payable to any aggrieved party of up to $5,000 if the aggrieved party was subject to prohibited retaliation.

Study of Secure Scheduling Ordinance Impacts

The city will contract with academic researchers who have a proven track record of rigorous analysis of the impacts of labor standards regulations to conduct an evaluation of the impacts of the ordinance for the baseline, one-year and two-year periods following implementation.  Areas of evaluation shall include, but not be limited to the impacts to businesses, including costs, and the impacts on employees of the requirements of this ordinance, differences and challenges between limited and full service restaurants in implementing the ordinance, and the interplay of diversity programs and access to hours lists.

Efforts to identify whether other industries have scheduling practices that should be considered for coverage under the ordinance may be conducted under a separate study, by contracting with academic researchers who have a proven track record of rigorous analysis of labor standards regulations.

Up Next:  Details about collective bargaining agreements are coming tomorrow.